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Total duration 2 h 20 min
2 intermissions (25 min)
10 performances
25.8.2017 – 21.9.2017
Ballets
Main auditorium
tickets
15-119 €
Lady of Camellias

A story of love, sacrifice and longing

Young Armand falls passionately in love with a celebrated courtesan of Parisian high society. Only for a fleeting moment can the lovers live their dream together in the countryside.

Lady of the Camellias, based on the novel by Alexandre Dumas, fils, opens autumn 2017 at the FNB. This ballet is the most famous creation of American choreographer Val Caniparoli. It combines elements of Fred Astaire and Gene Kelly’s showy splendour with the expressive rhythms of folkloric dance and the flowing grace of figure skating. The events of the tragic romance are accompanied by of Frédéric Chopin’s poignant music.

Recommended for children over the age of 9.

Sets and costumes courtesy of Boston Ballet

Lady of Camellias

“My inspiration came above all from the film Camille starring Greta Garbo, not so much the original Dumas novel or the opera based on it.”

– Val Caniparoli

Lady of the Camellias is one of Val Caniparoli’s best-known works

American choreographer Val Caniparoli originally created the choreography for the Florida Ballet in 1994. Thereafter, the work has been performed by several ballet companies, and the Boston Ballet led by Mikko Nissinen premiered its production in 2004. Caniparoli is a prolific choreographer, and there are works by him in the repertoire of about 40 ballet companies. Lady of the Camellias is one of hist best-known works.

Val Caniparoli was born in 1951. He was a member of the San Francisco Ballet before becoming a choreographer. He also studied music for 13 years, playing the alto sax, clarinet and flute. His music studies influenced his work; he has used musical works from various genres in his ballet productions.

Caniparoli’s movement language is described as being strongly rooted in classical ballet. He also seeks inspiration in a variety of other styles such as contemporary dance, ethnic dance and figure skating. The latter is apparent particularly in the many virtuoso lifts that the principal characters have to execute.

Lady of Camellias

Choreographer Val Caniparoli:

“Lady of the Camellias is a retelling of the novel through my vision”

Read the choreographer’s interview

#FNBcamellias

Lady of Camellias

“This is a very special ballet… it is a work of striking theatrical power… Desire, passion, bliss, sacrifice, betrayal…”

– The Globe and Mail

Synopsis

Marguerite returns to her apartment with her guests after an evening at the theatre, accompanied by her escort, the Baron de Varville. There are flirtations and camaraderie, liberally sprinkled with bottles of champagne, and the guests dance their enjoyment. Suddenly, the smitten Armand enters escorted by Prudence, an opportunistic ex-courtesan and milliner. At last Marguerite succumbs to Armand’s advances and invites him secretly to her boudoir after the soiree.

Marguerite and Armand, in the summer of their love, are joined by guests for a picnic and relaxation. The festivities are interrupted by the arrival of the Baron de Varville, who demands the return of Marguerite. Dusk is falling down when Duval Sr., father of Armand, appears unannounced asking that Marguerite renounce her love for Armand so that he and his family might continue their lives in social acceptability. The ill Marguerite reluctantly agrees, and sets forth a plan to delude Armand into believing she no longer loves him and wishes to return to her protector, Baron de Varville.

Olympe is giving a grand party. A weakened Marguerite and the Baron de Varville enter. Armand, overwhelmed by the passion of his loss, publicly humiliates Marguerite. The Baron de Varville challenges Armand to a duel; the challenge is accepted.

Ill and alone in her dementia, Marguerite envisions the realities and possibilities of the triumph of Olympe and the realization of her inevitable loss. In her death, she relives the passion of her love and rediscovers her innocence.

A full synopsis and background information are available in the programme booklet.

Creative team

Choreography
Val Caniparoli
Music
Frédéric Chopin
Costumes
Robert Glay de la Rose
Scenic design
David Gano
Scenic design (act ii)
Robert Glay de la Rose
Lighting design
John Cuff
Staging
Oğulcan Borova
Staging
Charla Whiteley
Libretto, concept and score
Robert Glay de la Rose
Libretto, concept and score
Norbert Vesak
Libretto, concept and score adapted by
Val Caniparoli

Cast

Performances and tickets

2 h 20 min
2 intermissions (25 min)
10 performances
25.8.2017 – 21.9.2017
Ballets
Main auditorium
tickets
15-119 €
Fri 25.8.2017
at 19:00
Sat 26.8.2017
at 19:00
Fri 1.9.2017
at 19:00
Sat 2.9.2017
at 19:00
Tue 5.9.2017
at 19:00
Sat 9.9.2017
at 14:00
Thu 14.9.2017
at 19:00
Fri 15.9.2017
at 19:00
Wed 20.9.2017
at 19:00
Thu 21.9.2017
at 19:00
La Traviata

Verdi’s opera La traviata based on the story

The novel La dame aux camélias (1848) by Alexandre Dumas fils has been adapted for the stage, for film and for TV. Giuseppe Verdi’s opera La traviata is also based on the story.

Enjoy the same story at the opera as La traviata returns to the FNOB in December 2017!

Order refreshments here

Afternoon Tea

Sweet and savoury for the season

See what you like: choose your favourites on this season’s rich menu.

Book your refreshments beforehand online or at the Opera Restaurant sales desk; you will have a much wider range to choose from, and you will not have to queue in the interval. Download the seating plan of the Opera Restaurant (PDF).

Opera Restaurant sales desk
Tel. +358 9 4030 2377 on weekdays 09.00–11.00 and 12.00–16.00
Service desk beside the box office in the Opera House foyer on the Töölönlahti side open from Tuesday to Friday 12.00–16.00
ravintolapalvelut[at]opera.fi

Season ticket

kiikarit

Buy a season ticket and get benefits

If you visit us several times a year and would like to ensure that you get a seat at future premieres, the season ticket is a perfect choice for you.  As a season ticket holder, you will receive discounts and benefits and a designated seat in the auditorium.

Audience comments

Dominic Schmidt
“It was just lovely. The choreography and the level of perfection and detail in the music and dance is a pleasure to watch. Bravo from a german visitor.”